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Indications

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. ENBREL can be taken with methotrexate or used alone. Read More

ENBREL is indicated for chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) in children 4 years and older and adults who may benefit from taking injections or pills (systemic therapy) or phototherapy (ultraviolet light). 
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis. ENBREL can be used with or without methotrexate.
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis. 
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in children ages 2 years and older. Close

Common questions about ENBREL

Choose a topic below to find answers to frequently asked questions about ENBREL. If you don’t see your question, just call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday, to speak with an ENBREL Support® specialist who will be happy to help.

Choose a topic below to find answers to frequently asked questions about ENBREL. If you don’t see your question, just call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday, to speak with an ENBREL Support® specialist who will be happy to help.

  • Insurance and Medicare

    accordion toggle icon Will my insurance cover ENBREL?

    A. Many insurance plans cover ENBREL. Your actual cost may vary depending on your dose, insurance coverage, and eligibility for support programs. Talk to your insurance provider for specific information about your prescription coverage.

    Read more about paying for ENBREL » 
    accordion toggle icon Does Medicare cover ENBREL?

    A. If you have Medicare, you can sign up for a plan that can help cover the cost of ENBREL. Our Medicare Solutions team can help patients understand their Medicare coverage. Medicare Solutions specialists are available 8 AM to 8 PM ET, Monday through Friday. Just call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735).

    Learn more about Medicare Solutions »
    accordion toggle icon Does Medicaid cover ENBREL?

    A. Each Medicaid agency is different. Talk to your insurance provider for specific information about your prescription coverage.

    accordion toggle icon How do I get insurance prior authorization for ENBREL?

    A. Your healthcare provider should work with your insurance company to complete a Prior Authorization.

  • Dosing

    accordion toggle icon What’s the dosage for adults?

    A. For moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis
    Your doctor will recommend the best dose and dosing schedule for you. But, in general, the recommended dose of ENBREL is 50 mg, once a week.

    For moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults

    Your doctor will recommend the best dose and dosing schedule for you. But the dosing schedule is generally:

    First 3 months: ENBREL 50 mg, twice a week (3 or 4 days apart)

    After 3 months: ENBREL 50 mg, once a week for maintenance

    Your doctor may also choose to start you with 25 mg or 50 mg of ENBREL, once per week. Ask your doctor what dose is right for you.

    accordion toggle icon What’s the dosage for children?

    A. For moderate to severe polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis or moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in children ages 4-17

    Your doctor will recommend the best dose and dosing schedule for your child. But, for most children, dosing is based on weight:

    If your child weighs 138 lb or more: ENBREL 50 mg, once a week

    If your child weighs less than 138 lb: ENBREL 0.8 mg/kg, once a week

    accordion toggle icon I missed a dose. What should I do?

    A. If you forget to take ENBREL when you are supposed to, call your doctor to find out when you should take your next dose. It’s important to take ENBREL as scheduled.

    accordion toggle icon Can I get a refresher on how to inject ENBREL?

    A. If you have questions about how to inject ENBREL, you should talk to your doctor. You can also watch demonstrations and get information about injecting online.

    Watch demos
  • Injecting ENBREL

    accordion toggle icon How do I inject ENBREL?

    A. Your doctor or nurse will train you on how to inject ENBREL. Also, remember to thoroughly read the Instructions for Use that come with your ENBREL medication before injecting with ENBREL. The Instructions for Use cover everything you need to know about how to use ENBREL. After that, you can also watch these injection demos to supplement the information you got from your doctor or nurse.

    Additionally, an ENBREL Nurse Partner™ can offer one-on-one supplemental injection support at home or over the phone. To enroll in the ENBREL Nurse Partner™ program, call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday.

    ENBREL Nurse Partners™ are nurses by training, but they are not part of your treatment team or an extension of your doctor’s office. ENBREL Nurse Partners™ do not inject patients with ENBREL. You will be referred to your doctor’s office for clinical advice.

    accordion toggle icon Where on the body do I inject ENBREL?

    A. You can inject ENBREL on the front of the middle thigh, on the outer area of your upper arm (outer arm only if someone else is giving you the injection), or on your stomach (except for the 2-inch area around your belly button). Choose a different site each time you give yourself an injection. If you need to use the same injection site, just make sure it is not the same spot on that site you used last time. Do not inject into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard. Avoid injecting into areas with scars or stretch marks.

    See how to take ENBREL  

    Skin reactions around the injection area, such as redness, pain, swelling, itching, or bruising have happened. On average, these symptoms go away within 3 to 5 days. If you have any of these reactions and they don’t go away or get worse, call your doctor.

    accordion toggle icon Can I let ENBREL warm up before injecting?

    A. Injecting cold ENBREL can be uncomfortable. To help make it more comfortable, take ENBREL out of the fridge and wait for it to reach room temperature (which should take at least 30 minutes before injecting). Do not remove the white cap from the ENBREL SureClick® autoinjector until you are ready to inject. Do not warm it in a microwave or in hot water, and do not remove the needle cover while you wait. Keep these guidelines in mind:

        • In general, store ENBREL in the refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C)

        • You may store the ENBREL syringe, SureClick® Autoinjector, Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge, ENBREL single-dose vial, or the dose tray for the multi‐use vial at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C) for up to 14 days

        • Once ENBREL has reached room temperature, do not put it back in the refrigerator

        • Throw away ENBREL that has been stored at room temperature after 14 days

    Learn about room temperature storage  
    accordion toggle icon What if my skin around the injection site gets red and itchy?

    A. Sometimes this can happen. Some common injection site reactions include redness, pain, swelling, itching, or bruising. However, these symptoms tend to go away within 3 to 5 days. If they don’t go away or get worse, call your doctor.

    Learn about possible side effects  
    accordion toggle icon What should I do if the needle is bent or the injection device is damaged?

    A. If a needle or an injection device is damaged in any way, don’t try to use it or fix it. Also, don’t throw it away. Call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday, and we will help you.

  • Disposal after injecting

    accordion toggle icon What should I do with my needles, syringes, vials, SureClick® autoinjectors, or Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridges after injecting?

    A. Right after injecting, discard your needle, syringe, vials, SureClick® autoinjector, or Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge in a puncture-resistant sharps disposal container (do not recap or reuse). You can buy one at your local pharmacy, or you can order one through ENBREL Support® at 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday.

  • Side effects

    accordion toggle icon What are the most common side effects of ENBREL?

    A. The most common side effects of ENBREL are infections (like the common cold, sinusitis, and the flu) and injection site reactions. Injection site reactions have occurred, such as redness, itching, pain, swelling, bleeding, or bruising. These symptoms usually go away within 3 to 5 days. If you have pain, redness, or swelling around the injection site that does not go away or gets worse, call your healthcare provider.

    Learn more about possible side effects  
    accordion toggle icon What should I do if I get a fever or infection while taking ENBREL?

    A. If you get an infection, especially one with a fever, you need to contact your doctor right away.

    Learn more about possible side effects  
  • Vaccines and flu shots

    accordion toggle icon Can I get vaccines and flu shots while taking ENBREL?

    A. Your vaccinations should be brought up to date before starting ENBREL. While you are taking ENBREL, you may be able to get some vaccines, including certain types of flu shots. You should not receive any live vaccines while taking ENBREL. Talk to your doctor before receiving vaccines, including flu shots, if you are taking ENBREL.

  • Storage

    accordion toggle icon How should I store ENBREL?

    A. ENBREL should be kept cool—between 36°F and 46°F (2°C and 8°C; the standard temperature range of most refrigerators). However, ENBREL can also be stored at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C) for up to 14 days. Once ENBREL has reached room temperature, do not put it back in the refrigerator. Throw away ENBREL that has been stored at room temperature after 14 days.

    Learn more about storage and travel  
    accordion toggle icon Can I still use ENBREL if I take it out of the fridge but don’t use it right away?

    A. ENBREL can stay at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C) for up to 14 days. However, once it reaches room temperature, you cannot put it back in the fridge. Throw away ENBREL that has been stored at room temperature for more than 14 days. If you use the multi-use vial, mixed ENBREL powder should be used right away or kept in the fridge at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) for up to 14 days.

    Learn more about storage and travel  
  • Travel

    accordion toggle icon Can I fly with my ENBREL needles, syringes, or injection devices?

    A. Check with your airline before you travel. They can tell you whether you can carry needles, syringes, or injection devices onto the plane. It is also a good idea to carry a copy of your prescription or a doctor’s note to show airport security. Notify the screener if you are carrying a sharps disposal container in your carry-on baggage.

    Learn more about storage and travel  
  • Pregnancy and nursing

    accordion toggle icon Can I take ENBREL if I am pregnant or trying to get pregnant?

    A. Before starting ENBREL, you should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant. ENBREL should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

    accordion toggle icon Can I take ENBREL if I’m nursing?

    A. Nursing mothers should know that ENBREL can pass into breast milk and may harm nursing infants. Work with your doctor to decide whether you will take ENBREL or breastfeed. You should not do both.

  • Surgery

    accordion toggle icon Do I need to stop taking ENBREL if I’m having surgery?

    A. Sometimes surgery increases your chances of getting an infection. Because ENBREL can also increase your risk of getting an infection, your doctor may want you to stop taking ENBREL for a while before and after your operation.

  • Natural rubber or latex allergies

    accordion toggle icon Is there natural rubber or latex in the SureClick® Autoinjector, Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge, prefilled syringe, single-dose vial, or multi-use vial?

    A. If you are sensitive to latex, do not handle the SureClick® Autoinjector, Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge, or the prefilled syringe. The needle cover of the prefilled syringe, needle cover within the white cap of the SureClick® Autoinjector, and needle cover within the purple cap of the Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge are made of dry natural rubber (which comes from latex). Talk to your doctor about the best injection method for you.

  • ENBREL and methotrexate

    accordion toggle icon Can ENBREL be taken with methotrexate?

    A. In moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis, ENBREL can be taken with or without methotrexate to help reduce joint pain and help stop additional joint damage.

    In medical studies of patients with moderate to severe RA, ENBREL was proven to help reduce joint pain and stop further joint damage better than methotrexate alone. And, people taking ENBREL for 6 months had less joint pain and damage than people who only took methotrexate. Your results may vary. Ask your doctor if ENBREL and methotrexate could work for you.

  • SureClick® Autoinjector

    accordion toggle icon Where can I inject myself?

    A. You may use any of these approved injection sites: front of the middle thigh, on the outer area of your upper arm (outer arm only if someone else is giving you the injection), or on your stomach (except the 2-inch area around your belly button). Choose a different site each time you give yourself an injection. If you need to use the same injection site, just make sure it is not the same spot on that site you used last time. Do not inject into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard. Avoid injecting into areas with scars or stretch marks.

    If your healthcare provider decides that you or a caregiver can give ENBREL, you or your caregiver should receive training on the right way to prepare and inject ENBREL. Do not try to inject ENBREL unless you have been shown the right way by your healthcare provider or nurse. Also, remember to thoroughly read the Instructions for Use that come with your ENBREL medication before injecting with ENBREL. The Instructions for Use cover everything you need to know about how to use ENBREL.  After that, you can also watch this SureClick® Autoinjector demo to supplement the information you got from your doctor or nurse. Have questions? Please call us at 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday.

    accordion toggle icon Where do I inject? Do I have to use all three sites?

    A. You may use any of these approved injection sites: front of the middle thigh, on the outer area of your upper arm (outer arm only if someone else is giving you the injection), or on your stomach (except the 2-inch area around your belly button). Choose a different site each time you give yourself an injection. If you need to use the same injection site, just make sure it is not the same spot on that site you used last time. Do not inject into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard. Avoid injecting into areas with scars or stretch marks.

    accordion toggle icon Which one is recommended: stretching or pinching the skin during the injection?

    A. You can do either one as long as you create a firm surface. When pinching, make sure to pinch the skin firmly between your thumb and fingers, creating an area about two inches wide. You may also stretch the skin firmly by moving your thumb and fingers in opposite directions, creating an area about two inches wide.

    accordion toggle icon Do I press and release or continue to press down on the purple button as my SureClick®️ Autoinjector is injecting?

    A. In order to inject correctly, firmly push down the autoinjector against the skin until it stops moving. Then press the purple start button. You will hear a click. While still pushing the autoinjector down on your skin, you can then lift your thumb off the purple button. The injection could take about 15 seconds.

    accordion toggle icon I tried to give my SureClick® Autoinjector injection and I pressed the purple start button but nothing happened. The window is still clear and I didn’t feel anything. What should I do?

    A. You can lift your finger (thumb) off the purple start button and place the prefilled autoinjector back on your injection site. Then, you can press the purple start button again. Make sure to push down the autoinjector firmly onto the skin, at a 90-degree angle until it stops moving. For more information, contact your healthcare provider and/or call 1-888-4ENBREL (1-888-436-2735) 8 AM to 11 PM ET, Monday through Sunday.

    accordion toggle icon What size is the hidden needle within the SureClick® Autoinjector?

    A. The SureClick® Autoinjector has a needle size of 27 gauge, ½ inch in length.

    accordion toggle icon How do I know when the injection is finished?

    A. Your injection could take about 15 seconds. The inspection window will start to fill with the yellow plunger once a click is heard, indicating the injection sequence has commenced. The injection will be complete once the entire window is fully yellow. You may hear a second click. When you remove the autoinjector, if the window has not turned yellow, or if it looks like the medicine is still injecting, this means you have not received a full dose. Call your healthcare provider immediately.

    accordion toggle icon When should the cap/needle shield be removed?

    A. Pull the white cap off only when you are ready to inject. Do not leave the white cap off for more than 5 minutes.

    accordion toggle icon Why do I have to use the SureClick® Autoinjector within 5 minutes after I remove the white cap?

    A. Waiting longer than 5 minutes can dry out the medicine.

    accordion toggle icon Which part of the SureClick® Autoinjector should be in contact with the skin?

    A. The green safety guard with the needle inside should be in contact with the skin at a 90-degree angle.

    accordion toggle icon Do I really have to wait 30 minutes for the medicine to reach room temperature before injecting?

    A. Leave the medicine at room temperature for at least 30 minutes prior to injecting yourself to minimize discomfort.

  • Enbrel Mini® cartridge with AutoTouch® autoinjector

+ See More

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about ENBREL?

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ENBREL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections
have happened in patients taking ENBREL. These infections include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that have

 
Close
Prescription Enbrel® (etanercept) is taken (given) by injection.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about ENBREL?

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ENBREL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections have happened in patients taking ENBREL. These infections include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that have spread throughout the body. Some patients have died from these infections. Your healthcare provider should test you for TB before you take ENBREL and monitor you closely for TB before, during, and after ENBREL treatment, even if you have tested negative for TB.

There have been some cases of unusual cancers, some resulting in death, reported in children and teenage patients who started using tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers before 18 years of age. Also, for children, teenagers, and adults taking TNF blockers, including ENBREL, the chances of getting lymphoma or other cancers may increase. Patients with RA may be more likely to get lymphoma.

Before starting ENBREL, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have any existing medical conditions
  • Are taking any medicines, including herbals
  • Think you have, are being treated for, have signs of, or are prone to infection. You should not start taking ENBREL if you have any kind of infection, unless your healthcare provider says it is okay
  • Have any open cuts or sores
  • Have diabetes, HIV, or a weak immune system
  • Have TB or have been in close contact with someone who has had TB
  • Were born in, lived in, or traveled to countries where there is more risk for getting TB. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure
  • Live, have lived in, or traveled to certain parts of the country (such as, the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys, or the Southwest) where there is a greater risk for certain kinds of fungal infections, such as histoplasmosis. These infections may develop or become more severe if you take ENBREL. If you don’t know if these infections are common in the areas you’ve been to, ask your healthcare provider
  • Have or have had hepatitis B
  • Have or have had heart failure
  • Develop symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness while taking ENBREL
  • Use the medicine Kineret (anakinra), Orencia (abatacept), or Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide)
  • Are taking anti-diabetic medicines
  • Have, have had, or develop a serious nervous disorder, seizures, any numbness or tingling, or a disease that affects your nervous system such as multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • Are scheduled to have surgery
  • Have recently received or are scheduled for any vaccines. All vaccines should be brought up-to-date before starting ENBREL. Patients taking ENBREL should not receive live vaccines.
  • Are allergic to rubber or latex
  • Are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding
  • Have been around someone with chicken pox

What are the possible side effects of ENBREL?

ENBREL can cause serious side effects including: New infections or worsening of infections you already have; hepatitis B can become active if you already have had it; nervous system problems, such as multiple sclerosis, seizures, or inflammation of the nerves of the eyes; blood problems (some fatal); new or worsening heart failure; new or worsening psoriasis; allergic reactions; autoimmune reactions, including a lupus-like syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis.

Common side effects include: Injection site reactions and upper respiratory infections (sinus infections).

In general, side effects in children were similar in frequency and type as those seen in adult patients. The types of infections reported were generally mild and similar to those usually seen in children.

These are not all the side effects with ENBREL. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

If you have any questions about this information, be sure to discuss them with your healthcare provider. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

Indications

Moderate to Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. ENBREL can be taken with methotrexate or used alone.

Psoriatic Arthritis

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis. ENBREL can be used with or without methotrexate.

Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis

ENBREL is indicated for chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) in children 4 years and older and adults who may benefit from taking injections or pills (systemic therapy) or phototherapy (ultraviolet light).

Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis.

Moderately to Severely Active Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in children ages 2 years and older.

References: 1. Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) prescribing information, Amgen. 2. Data on file, Amgen; [Summary of Clinical Efficacy; 2015]. 3. Alexander ST, et al. Mol Pharmacol. 2015;88:853-865. 4. Data on file, Amgen; [Report R20130052, 2014]. 5. Chen P, et al. CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol. 2016;5:484-494. 6. Sensipar® (cinacalcet) prescribing information, Amgen. 7. Ma JN, et al. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2011;337:275-284.
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