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Indications

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. ENBREL can be taken with methotrexate or used alone. Read More

ENBREL is indicated for chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) in children 4 years and older and adults who may benefit from taking injections or pills (systemic therapy) or phototherapy (ultraviolet light). 
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis. ENBREL can be used with or without methotrexate.
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis. 
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in children ages 2 years and older. Close
What is PsA Mobile

What is psoriatic arthritis (PsA)?

What is PsA_desktop

What is psoriatic arthritis (PsA)?

PsA is a lifelong condition that causes your joints to hurt and swell.
People with psoriatic arthritis can also have patches of red, thick skin
with silvery scales. About 1 million American adults have it.

PsA is a lifelong condition that causes your joints to hurt and swell. People with psoriatic arthritis can also have patches of red, thick skin with silvery scales. About 1 million American adults have it.

  • Overview
  • Symptoms
  • Meet Margo
  • Patient Stories

Take a few minutes to learn more about psoriatic arthritis.

  • What’s going on inside your body?

    Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling

    Your immune system is designed to help protect your body from many harmful things. But when your immune system doesn’t work right, it can make you sick. When you have psoriatic arthritis, cells from your immune system move into your joints and skin. These cells make several proteins that can cause swelling and pain. One of these proteins is called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF. Too much TNF may lead to inflammation. Inflammation is what causes the pain, swelling, and damage of your joints over time. Too much TNF may also make skin cells grow too quickly, forming plaques that you see on your skin.

    See what ENBREL does in response.
  • What are some of the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis?

    Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling

    Many people feel pain and stiffness in their joints, especially in the morning. The pain is often only in a joint on one side of your body and not in the same joint on the other side of your body. But there are also cases where the joints on either side of your body hurt. People may have entire fingers or toes that swell, which gives them a sausage-like appearance. There are also skin symptoms. People often get lesions (patches of red, thick skin with silvery scales on top). Usually, skin symptoms start first and joint pain begins later.

  • Could you have joint damage?

    Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling Psoriatic Arthritis can worsen, leading to increased joint pain, stiffness, and swelling

    The inflammation (or swelling) that causes your joint pain can also damage your joints. This joint damage is permanent, and it can get worse over time. Notice how a healthy joint compares to a damaged joint.

    Learn how biologic treatments help stop further joint damage.
  • Who gets psoriatic arthritis, and why?

    Husband and wife enjoying relaxing in the outdoors Husband and wife enjoying relaxing in the outdoors

    Men and women have the same chances of getting psoriatic arthritis. It usually starts between the ages of 30 and 50. No one knows the exact cause, but your genetics are thought to play a role.

  • Is your psoriatic arthritis getting worse?

    Illustrated example of psoriatic arthritis getting worse Illustrated example of psoriatic arthritis getting worse

    Psoriatic arthritis can get worse quickly. If your joints hurt, it could mean your joints are being damaged. However, joint damage can also continue to occur even when pain is controlled. That damage can’t be undone. That’s why it’s important to talk to your doctor and find the best way to manage your condition.

    Download an ENBREL Appointment Guide.

6 common symptoms
of PsA

These are the most common signs and symptoms of PsA. Talk to your doctor right away if you’re experiencing:

plaques on skin

Patches of red, thick skin with silvery scales on top, called plaques

jp 

Joint pain, stiffness, and swelling

swollen foot 

Swelling in the fingers or toes, with a sausage-like appearance

back-pain 

Back pain and stiffness

nail 

Changes in the nails, such as pitting (small depressions on the surface of the nail), thickening, ridges, and onycholysis (separation of the nail from the nail bed)

foot pain 

Pain or swelling at the base of, or behind, the heel

Your doctor will make a diagnosis based on your signs and symptoms. He or she might also do blood tests and X-rays to look for additional signs of psoriatic arthritis.


Most people with PsA see skin symptoms first. Joint pain usually follows, but it may not happen for many years. If you’re experiencing skin lesions or joint pain, talk to your doctor right away, especially if you’re experiencing both symptoms. These symptoms may seem unrelated, but they’re actually both signs of PsA.

Joint pain caused by PsA can lead to permanent joint damage, which is why it’s crucial that you talk to your doctor sooner rather than later. The pain is often only in a joint on one side of your body and not in the same joint on the other side of your body. Symptoms of PsA can change over time and get better or worse without warning. Skin symptoms in particular can get worse due to stress, skin injuries, infections, or reactions to some medicines. But some people don’t have skin symptoms when they are diagnosed with PsA.

ENBREL is a medicine that works to treat both skin and joint symptoms.* Even if you’re experiencing only one of these symptoms and not the other, talk to your doctor right away so they can help you manage your condition.

*In a clinical study, ENBREL was shown to be effective in improving joint symptoms in about half of psoriatic arthritis patients who used it. Clinical responses were apparent at the time of the first visit (4 weeks) and were maintained through 6 months of therapy.

Meet Margo*

See our latest commercial, and meet Margo: showing everyone she’s being her true self even while living with psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

*Actor Portrayal

Big Little Joys: Matt's Story

Learning to Live With Psoriatic Arthritis

Matt has always valued his ability to take care of himself. When psoriatic arthritis put his independence at risk, he started taking ENBREL. Watch how ENBREL helped Matt hold onto what matters most—making a positive impact in his community and spending quality time with his partner.

Matt has always valued his ability to take care of himself. When psoriatic arthritis put his independence at risk, he started taking ENBREL. Watch how ENBREL helped Matt hold onto what matters most–making a positive impact in his community and spending quality time with his partner.

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Doctor Discussion Guide

Use this simple guide to help your doctor understand how your PsA is impacting your life, and ask whether ENBREL is right for you.

Download the Doctor Discussion Guide  »
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Joint Damage Simulator

Joint pain can be a sign of permanent joint damage. Use the Joint Damage Simulator to see how joint damage can get worse over time.

View the Joint Damage Simulator  »
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STATWISE Symptom Tracking Tool

STATWISE™ is a mobile-based symptom tracking tool designed for people living with psoriatic arthritis.

Discover STATWISE™  »
+ See More

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about ENBREL?

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ENBREL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections
have happened in patients taking ENBREL. These infections include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that have

 
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Prescription Enbrel® (etanercept) is taken (given) by injection.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about ENBREL?

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ENBREL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections have happened in patients taking ENBREL. These infections include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that have spread throughout the body. Some patients have died from these infections. Your healthcare provider should test you for TB before you take ENBREL and monitor you closely for TB before, during, and after ENBREL treatment, even if you have tested negative for TB.

There have been some cases of unusual cancers, some resulting in death, reported in children and teenage patients who started using tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers before 18 years of age. Also, for children, teenagers, and adults taking TNF blockers, including ENBREL, the chances of getting lymphoma or other cancers may increase. Patients with RA may be more likely to get lymphoma.

Before starting ENBREL, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have any existing medical conditions
  • Are taking any medicines, including herbals
  • Think you have, are being treated for, have signs of, or are prone to infection. You should not start taking ENBREL if you have any kind of infection, unless your healthcare provider says it is okay
  • Have any open cuts or sores
  • Have diabetes, HIV, or a weak immune system
  • Have TB or have been in close contact with someone who has had TB
  • Were born in, lived in, or traveled to countries where there is more risk for getting TB. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure
  • Live, have lived in, or traveled to certain parts of the country (such as, the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys, or the Southwest) where there is a greater risk for certain kinds of fungal infections, such as histoplasmosis. These infections may develop or become more severe if you take ENBREL. If you don’t know if these infections are common in the areas you’ve been to, ask your healthcare provider
  • Have or have had hepatitis B
  • Have or have had heart failure
  • Develop symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness while taking ENBREL
  • Use the medicine Kineret (anakinra), Orencia (abatacept), or Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide)
  • Are taking anti-diabetic medicines
  • Have, have had, or develop a serious nervous disorder, seizures, any numbness or tingling, or a disease that affects your nervous system such as multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • Are scheduled to have surgery
  • Have recently received or are scheduled for any vaccines. All vaccines should be brought up-to-date before starting ENBREL. Patients taking ENBREL should not receive live vaccines.
  • Are allergic to rubber or latex
  • Are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding
  • Have been around someone with chicken pox

What are the possible side effects of ENBREL?

ENBREL can cause serious side effects including: New infections or worsening of infections you already have; hepatitis B can become active if you already have had it; nervous system problems, such as multiple sclerosis, seizures, or inflammation of the nerves of the eyes; blood problems (some fatal); new or worsening heart failure; new or worsening psoriasis; allergic reactions; autoimmune reactions, including a lupus-like syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis.

Common side effects include: Injection site reactions and upper respiratory infections (sinus infections).

In general, side effects in children were similar in frequency and type as those seen in adult patients. The types of infections reported were generally mild and similar to those usually seen in children.

These are not all the side effects with ENBREL. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

If you have any questions about this information, be sure to discuss them with your healthcare provider. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

Indications

Moderate to Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. ENBREL can be taken with methotrexate or used alone.

Psoriatic Arthritis

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, keeping joint damage from getting worse, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis. ENBREL can be used with or without methotrexate.

Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis

ENBREL is indicated for chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) in children 4 years and older and adults who may benefit from taking injections or pills (systemic therapy) or phototherapy (ultraviolet light).

Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis.

Moderately to Severely Active Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in children ages 2 years and older.

References: 1. Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) prescribing information, Amgen. 2. Data on file, Amgen; [Summary of Clinical Efficacy; 2015]. 3. Alexander ST, et al. Mol Pharmacol. 2015;88:853-865. 4. Data on file, Amgen; [Report R20130052, 2014]. 5. Chen P, et al. CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol. 2016;5:484-494. 6. Sensipar® (cinacalcet) prescribing information, Amgen. 7. Ma JN, et al. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2011;337:275-284.
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